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What are live cider & perry?

CAMRA encourages and promotes cider and perry which retain active yeast with the potential to carry on fermenting, however slowly, right up to the moment you drink it.

Cider and Perry are not brewed like beer, but fermented like wine. The fermentation process is both through the presence of active or ‘live yeast’ and through the action of bacteria (the friendly kind).

Some ciders and perry can improve with age solely through the action of slower acting yeast and other biological processes, as occurs with some wines. Like wine, not every cider is meant to mature or is suitable for ageing. The decision to age is made by the cider-maker in the selection of apple varieties and fermentation methods.

Cider or perry that has fully fermented usually results in a dry product and finishes virtually ‘uncarbonated, or ‘still’.

Where fermentation continues in its final vessel (e.g. a bottle) it will produce natural carbonation. Just how fizzy or sparkling the cider or perry becomes depends on the remaining active yeast, nutrients and sugars, in addition to any techniques employed by the cider maker that help to develop and retain natural carbonation.  Best practice encourages and promotes cider and perry which is fully fermented to dry or where natural carbonation is created by process.

Cider and Perry which undergoes such a second fermentation in its final vessel and have measurable ‘active yeast’ in that vessel can often be described as ‘live cider’ or ‘live perry’. The most recognisable will be labelled as ‘bottle conditioned, Pet Nat or ‘keg conditioned’.

What are live cider & perry?

CAMRA encourages and promotes cider and perry which retain active yeast with the potential to carry on fermenting, however slowly, right up to the moment you drink it.

Cider and Perry are not brewed like beer, but fermented like wine. The fermentation process is both through the presence of active or ‘live yeast’ and through the action of bacteria (the friendly kind).

Some ciders and perry can improve with age solely through the action of slower acting yeast and other biological processes, as occurs with some wines. Like wine, not every cider is meant to mature or is suitable for ageing. The decision to age is made by the cider-maker in the selection of apple varieties and fermentation methods.  

Cider or perry that has fully fermented usually results in a dry product and finishes virtually ‘uncarbonated, or ‘still’.

Where fermentation continues in its final vessel (e.g. a bottle) it will produce natural carbonation. Just how fizzy or sparkling the cider or perry becomes depends on the remaining active yeast, nutrients and sugars, in addition to any techniques employed by the cider maker that help to develop and retain natural carbonation.  Best practice encourages and promotes cider and perry which is fully fermented to dry or where natural carbonation is created by process.

Cider and Perry which undergoes such a second fermentation in its final vessel and have measurable ‘active yeast’ in that vessel can often be described as ‘live cider’ or ‘live perry’. The most recognisable will be labelled as ‘bottle conditioned, Pet Nat or ‘keg conditioned’.

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