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Pub of the future Pt.3

A positive look at how pubs are changing for the better, and how thriving pubs might look in the not-too-distant future. In this third instalment of Pub of the Future Katie Mather focuses on how pubs and similar venues like micropubs and taprooms can serve to become ever more inclusive and accessible, ensuring that they remain at the heart of our communities for generations to come. 

Illustrations by Lucie Cooke

Katie Mather 

A beer blogger-turned-food and drink writer, with regular work featured in Beer52’s Ferment magazine and Pellicle magazine. Co-owner of Corto, a neighbourhood beer, natural cider and wine bar in Clitheroe. Loves pubs.

Pub of the future Pt.3

A positive look at how pubs are changing for the better, and how thriving pubs might look in the not-too-distant future. In this third instalment of Pub of the Future Katie Mather focuses on how pubs and similar venues like micropubs and taprooms can serve to become ever more inclusive and accessible, ensuring that they remain at the heart of our communities for generations to come.

Illustrations by Lucie Cooke

Katie Mather 

A beer blogger-turned-food and drink writer. Co-owner of Corto in Clitheroe. Loves pubs.

Wild Beer Co. Barrels
When was the last time you visited the pub? Last weekend? Yesterday? Are you reading this article on your phone from the comfort of your favourite bar right now? 

For many people, the pub isn’t somewhere they think of visiting on a regular basis. It’s not a big part of their life like it is for the rest of us, and there are lots of reasons why. Around 12,000 pubs have sadly closed since 2019, and that number continues to grow as more pubs, clubs and bars struggle with rising costs and dwindling demand for their services. 

In our previous Pub of the Future features, we looked at the accessibility of our local pubs. We also looked at how some pub owners have led the way in diversifying their offering, to make use of their under-used venues and bring more punters in. In this part of the series, we’re going to take a quick look at how the Pub of the Future might use empathy and connection to thrive. 

Wild Beer Co. Barrels
When was the last time you visited the pub? Last weekend? Yesterday? Are you reading this article on your phone from the comfort of your favourite bar right now? 

For many people, the pub isn’t somewhere they think of visiting on a regular basis. It’s not a big part of their life like it is for the rest of us, and there are lots of reasons why. Around 12,000 pubs have sadly closed since 2019, and that number continues to grow as more pubs, clubs and bars struggle with rising costs and dwindling demand for their services. 

In our previous Pub of the Future features, we looked at the accessibility of our local pubs. We also looked at how some pub owners have led the way in diversifying their offering, to make use of their under-used venues and bring more punters in. In this part of the series, we’re going to take a quick look at how the Pub of the Future might use empathy and connection to thrive. 

WILD BEER CO, Barrels

Connected to the Community 

You might think your local pub stands alone, but in most tightly-woven communities, pubs, clubs and bars work together to provide a safe environment with its community’s priorities at the heart of every decision its management team makes. 

The Pub of the Future will be an integral part of local networks that keep drinkers safe and locals happy. Networks like PubWatch, which work in conjunction with the local police force and council offices to spread important information, already exist. But in a fully cooperative community, pubs could work alongside other local businesses, organisations and even charities to promote the safe and inclusive use of their venues.

The Pub of the Future will be an integral part of local networks that keep drinkers safe and locals happy.”

— Katie Mather

The Pub of the Future will be an integral part of local networks that keep drinkers safe and locals happy

— Katie Mather

Connected to the Community 

You might think your local pub stands alone, but in most tightly-woven communities, pubs, clubs and bars work together to provide a safe environment with its community’s priorities at the heart of every decision its management team makes. 

The Pub of the Future will be an integral part of local networks that keep drinkers safe and locals happy. Networks like PubWatch, which work in conjunction with the local police force and council offices to spread important information, already exist. But in a fully cooperative community, pubs could work alongside other local businesses, organisations and even charities to promote the safe and inclusive use of their venues. 

WILD BEER CO, Barrels
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A local pub that cares for its community and the wider world, securing a future for pub-goers everywhere. What a thing to look forward to!

— Katie Mather

A local pub that cares for its community and the wider world, securing a future for pub-goers everywhere. What a thing to look forward to!

— Katie Mather

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